AngrynomicsAngrynomics
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Angrynomics

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Eric Lonergan

Many countries are experiencing a boom in their economies. The advantages of capitalism in today's world are not, however, spread equally. Numerous people face financial insecurity and are uncertain about their future. Even worse, people in power don't appear to want to address the legitimate concerns of the majority. We need to create more fair economies using modern means, such as regional autonomy and national wealth funds, to prevent the rage that fuels harmful tribalism, like racism and nationalism. Directly supporting consumption will fix recessions. The central banks supported the market in the last recession by providing huge bailouts to corporations. The situation felt outrageously unfair to many people. Directly transferring wealth to citizens would be a better option. The economy could be kept going more effectively if this were done - and, most importantly, it would not be perceived as unfair.

hashtagself-help
hashtagpsychology
hashtagsocial-life
hashtagpolitics
clock14 min
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What's it about?

Angrynomics explores the increasing level of anger around the world. Using political theory and social science, this easy-to-understand book examines the reasons for growing resentment and suggests some possible solutions.

Book summary

Many countries are experiencing a boom in their economies. The advantages of capitalism in today's world are not, however, spread equally. Numerous people face financial insecurity and are uncertain about their future. Even worse, people in power don't appear to want to address the legitimate concerns of the majority. We need to create more fair economies using modern means, such as regional autonomy and national wealth funds, to prevent the rage that fuels harmful tribalism, like racism and nationalism. Directly supporting consumption will fix recessions. The central banks supported the market in the last recession by providing huge bailouts to corporations. The situation felt outrageously unfair to many people. Directly transferring wealth to citizens would be a better option. The economy could be kept going more effectively if this were done - and, most importantly, it would not be perceived as unfair.

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The right kind of anger can benefit societies.

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Unresponsive politicians and economic insecurity feed public rage.

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There is a need to redesign contemporary capitalism to prevent outrage.

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The economy makes our lives more stressful, which leads to anger.

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By rearranging our economies, we can reduce anger and increase equality.

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