Learning New Things Is Easier When You Help Others

Are you motivated to do something because you’re also helping someone else? Unfortunately, there's a misconception that decisions are zero-sum equations; for example, if X advances someone else's career, it could negatively impact mine.

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Bitely Team
Last update:calendarApr 20, 2024
Read time:clock4 min
Learning New Things Is Easier When You Help Others

Are you motivated to do something because you’re also helping someone else? Unfortunately, there's a misconception that decisions are zero-sum equations; for example, if X advances someone else's career, it could negatively impact mine. With this mindset, altruism seems unlikely or even impossible. But altruism can drive change for us and others.  

 

Kaleb Wentzel Fisher, a film editor, talked about his journey of playing the cello. He enjoyed music when he was little and wanted to reconnect with his musical side. Only after his lessons had just begun did the COVID-19 pandemic hit, making it impossible for him to see his instructor. So many people would’ve given up and let the pandemic ruin another plan of theirs. But he decided; otherwise, he knew if he had given up right and there.


He paid for lessons he would take in the future. By doing so, his instructor could get through the crisis (social distancing makes music lessons hard) and set up something to look forward to after restrictions are lifted.


Difficult circumstances tend to increase our altruistic behavior.


When faced with a difficult situation, we are more likely to act in ways that alleviate the suffering of others. Even after the worst has passed, we can develop new strengths and abilities if we support each other. Through continuous learning, you can help address team needs and strengthen your role.


Accountability: Relying on it 


You have a generous view of learning a new skill, like having study buddies. Remember how you helped your friends while studying for exams in high school? The more you explained the exam topics to them, the better you understood them and noticed new details. This is true for almost everyone. Motivating each other to study shows that grades matter to everyone. It is harder to give up when you are part of a team. A sense of responsibility improves your ability.


You can gain an emotional boost when you see how pleased your teacher is that you are working hard. Maybe that's why the class you did best in was the one with your favorite teacher. A sense of responsibility encourages you to keep doing good things.


A 15-minute escape


Adding new tasks and activities to an already-packed schedule is not always easy. Kaleb worked from home, which made it difficult for him to devote long periods to his instrument. However, he found that he could fit fifteen minutes of space in his schedule to practice in different places. 


While this meant he could only practice for fifteen minutes at a time, he also had fifteen minutes to review scales or a song. He kept his cello where he could easily see it to ensure his motivation didn't wane. Often, we find it challenging to learn something new because we don't have time. But even just fifteen minutes of attention during the day can help. So take that violin, learn that language, make that dish. Spend all of those fifteen minutes for yourself.


Check out Bitely to gain new insights in just 15 minutes a day.

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